Tags

Share this Episode

Comments 18

    1. I am with you, Bill. I don’t have the stomach to listen. Whatever would the church do without its obsession for regulating sex and wielding “inspired” patriarchal control?

  1. Thanks to Dallin Oaks, I now know why Jesus called Judas Iscariot as an apostle. This man does not speak for God, and like the words of Judas, I reject the teachings of Dallin. I will not harm myself or others by giving this Pharisee another minute attention, no matter what his official church title.

  2. I won’t dwell on the details of how E Oaks’ ministry has screwed me over as an LGBT Mormon. But it amazes me, that after all the decades he has worked on this issue, he is still light-years away from understanding what it is like to be a gay mormon, or from having any desire or understanding how to make our lives better. It’s incredible.

  3. So he says it was the goodness of religion that spurred the end of slavery and later the civil rights movement. I wish he would have paused, and then explained how the racist views of the LDS church he’s representing helped push the civil rights movement forward.

    I would like to hear his explanation of why his church reacted a decade later to social pressures, instead of doing whats right under the umbrella of the goodness of religion…

  4. Dallin Oaks needs to spend more time pondering compassion and love, and less time hanging out across the street at Kitrton and McKonkie. Those lawyers have poisoned his mind. He’s a fallen apostle for sure.

  5. So he says it was the goodness of religion that spurred the end of slavery and later the civil rights movement. I wish he would have paused, and then explained how the racist policy/views of the LDS church he’s representing helped push the civil rights movement forward… Can you imagine the church letting the Reverend Martin Luther King speak in the tabernacle in the 60’s?

    If it’s the goodness of religion that advanced progress in civil rights, then I would like to hear his explanation as to why his religion (with a direct line to God) was a decade behind the movement and only changed because of social/governmental pressures…

    He performs a remarkable job of double speak…

    1. Yes, that part really kind of bowled me over. It takes balls to stand up there and say that when your church played no active role in civil rights from the 19th century onward. In 20 years his replacement will argue for religion as a public good and cite the recognition of gays. The Mormons–always at least a few decades behind the curve.

  6. “And with this question I think we’ll end it here” What? Your an apostle of the Lord dude. Bear witness and teach God’s children. Don’t just end it there because someone lobbed you a tough question that you completely failed to answer.

  7. Elder Oaks employs some significant logical fallacies in his argument. He appeals to authority over and over to support his claim that religion is critical in stability and morality of society. He cites no studies that support that. He does cite studies that show the decline of religion in America and subtly uses that to support his appeals to authority. His insulation from criticism and belief of his righteousness shows through to me in this talk. His idea that religion should have special protection doesn’t have any support from anything he cites.

  8. Dallin Oaks said he is ready to be accountable to a higher authority for his actions when asked about people that are taking their lives. I hope God hears his words and make him accountable soon. As you wish Oaks. Now just wait the justice of God.

  9. I’m impressed, I have to admit. Seldom do I come across a blog that’s
    both educative and interesting, and without a doubt,
    you’ve hit the nail on the head. The problem is an issue that not enough folks are speaking intelligently
    about. I am very happy I came across this during my hunt for something regarding this.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.