About

Founded in 2005, Mormon Stories podcast is the longest running and most popular Mormon-themed podcast.  Hosted by Dr. John Dehlin (Clinical/Counseling Psychology), Mormon Stories podcast seeks to understand, explore, challenge, and improve the Mormon experience through stories.  Some of the primary objectives of Mormon Stories podcast include:

  1. Building greater awareness regarding accurate LDS/Mormon church history, doctrine, and theology.
  2. Identifying opportunities for growth/improvement within the LDS church, and within broader Mormon culture.
  3. Providing support to Mormons who are transitioning way from orthodox Mormonism, with a particular emphasis on:
    • Minimizing the anxiety, depression, and occasional suicidality that can accompany a transition away from religious orthodoxy.
    • Reducing the number of unnecessary divorces attributable to faith transitions.
    • Creating a community of support for liberal/progressive and post-Mormons.

Mormon Stories podcast operates in partnership with the Open Stories Foundation (a 501c3 non-profit), and obtained over 5.2 million iTunes downloads and Facebook/Youtube views in 2017.  The work of Mormon Stories podcast has been featured in the New York Times, National Public Radio, Good Morning America, the Wall Street Journal, VH1, the Huffington Post, and VICE NEWS.

If you are new to Mormon Stories podcast, a fantastic way to begin exploring the podcast is to begin with our Top 25 most important/popular episodes of all time.

Your feedback is important to us. Please let us know:

  • What you love about Mormon Stories podcast.
  • What topics you would like to see us cover.
  • What types of guests you would like to see us bring on to Mormon Stories, and
  • What we can do to help make Mormon Stories better.

Please email us at MormonStories@gmail.com for your feedback.

Comments 31

  1. John,
    I just visited you blog website as I have over the past couple of years, and I was so pleased to see that you are going to continue with your interviews. I carry several of them on my PDA and listen to them from time to time. I especially liked the Ted Lyon and Glen Kearney interviews. I listened to most of the other interviews, and some of them made me a little uncomfortable, but I guess that is the price of learning. I hope you continue for a long time with the same unbiased approach even though some subjects make guys like me squirm a little. I am sending a donation and though small, I hope it helps to keep you going.
    Sincerely,

    Steve Mayne

  2. John,

    If I would have come across this site a year ago I think I’d still be married. Even though I’m one of the unfortunate guys who’s wife leaves him because of disbelief in the LDS church your podcasts and workshops are helping me rebuild some broken bridges with the ex wife and making a better environment to raise our son.

    I wish more people in Utah(family and old in-laws) had the same honest and fair attitude as yours. I hope someday I can share my personal story to the world and better the lives of others like you have so done.

    I’m in the military stationed in England and people thank me all the time for serving the United States and the United Kingdom so I’d like to take this opportunity to say thank you for all you do and your service to better the community. Because of your website I’m much happier and I have a better outlook on life. I’m able to keep pressing on so I can do my best to perform my military duties.
    Thank you very much,
    Trevor

  3. John,

    I was introduced to your podcast by a good friend of mine. It was during a time that I was exploring my faith, spirituality, and religion. I am so thankful for what you do and for offering more than just the “three hour block” to those of us who want it. I find that whether or not I agree with anyone’s position on a given topic it allows me to explore where others are coming from. I have since been introduced to various doctrine by all of the notable LDS scholars like Hugh Nibley, Richard Bushman, etc… Anyways, I am in the military (active duty) and I know your podcast will help me through some difficult times in Afghanistan next year. Thanks John and PLEASE don’t stop these podcasts! (p.s. I am now a paid subscriber! yesssssss!)

  4. hi John,
    Thanks for your good and hard word on these Mormon issues. You are trully helping many many people all over the country and the world. Thanks to your job, it inspired me to open my own blog in portuguese and raise some of these questions in my own language in Brazil.
    I would like to know if have you ever thought in having a section in your blog dedicated in refer to other similar blogs, like a links page?
    Thanks!

    http://diariohistoriasud.blogspot.com/

  5. I listened to your presentation “Why people leave the LDS Church…” and wanted to tell you that you certainly have great insight. I am a university professor, former bishop, high councilman, early morning seminary teacher, etc. and, yet, 7 years ago I began to do consulting in the Middle East. At that time I was a ward missionary and I had extensive discussions with my Muslim friends. A long story, but as a result I began to seriously question the Church. The first time I expressed my concerns to my priesthood leader (i was his 1st assistant), his response was to tell me that he would have to release me. I was subsequently released as a home teacher via email, which told me i was not worthy. This followed with about 5 years of trying to be inactive. My wife, however, is the unquestioning, loving, devoted person that would never doubt. I have really struggled with my beliefs, but am attending and now participating again. I appreciated listening to your presentation and the insight it had. I sent the link to my wife and current bishop.

  6. I listened to your presentation “Why people leave the LDS Church…” and wanted to tell you that you certainly have great insight. I am a university professor, former bishop, high councilman, early morning seminary teacher, etc. and, yet, 7 years ago I began to do consulting in the Middle East. At that time I was a ward missionary and I had extensive discussions with my Muslim friends. A long story, but as a result I began to seriously question the Church. The first time I expressed my concerns to my priesthood leader (i was his 1st assistant), his response was to tell me that he would have to release me. I was subsequently released as a home teacher via email, which told me i was not worthy. This followed with about 5 years of trying to be inactive. My wife, however, is the unquestioning, loving, devoted person that would never doubt. I have really struggled with my beliefs, but am attending and now participating again. I appreciated listening to your presentation and the insight it had. I sent the link to my wife and current bishop.

  7. These interviews are boring.  Why don’t you go back to San Jose Pinula, Guatemala to baptize all those little poor kids that lived in the slums outside the town, as you used to do.    Remember how you started the first Branch in that town by baptizing only the poorest of the poor & how you were affraid of Knocking doors at the Middle class houses in the town? 

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  11. I am a fully active, fully believing member of the LDS church who loves to study and consider. I have enjoyed and continue to enjoy many of the podcasts you provide. My comment is that over time my experience with this site is that it is becoming more and more negative, not sure that is the correct word – i then looked at your board of directors and saw why – all but one are in some way negative toward the LDS faith – it would seem that this site would be better balanced if you had a greater representation of fully active believers.
    I enjoy the site but see it slipping away from its postive nature and becoming a site about creating doubt and subtly destroying faith rather than just sharing stories.

    thanks for what you do, just some thoughts.

    1. I’m a very active LDS priesthood holder and came across this site by clicking an ad on Facebook. Facebook ads can be targeted to any demographic you wish. In this case it was for those of the LDS faith apparently. I read about the upcoming conference in San Francisco for LGBTAQ LDS Members. Quite frankly I wasn’t sure there were enough to merit a conference, nevertheless I thought it was admirable. As I read on I was wondering the same as you noted, Mark. I’m not sure how positive and neutral this site is, but if it has an agenda to slowly weaken the faith of those who are LDS, then indeed it certainly not a site for me or any other good standing LDS person.

    2. I am a first time listener who is very active and faithful. I have a husband who is becoming inactive and has lost his faith. I would have to say that even though this is the first time listening, there are things being said that draw people away from the church. The focus is on the problems and mistakes people make and the negative things, instead of the faith building, positive testimonies and truths that help people continue to believe and gain a greater testimony and faith. In other words, the things I’m hearing are doubt-filling, and testimony destroying discussions. Where are your stories of encouragement and discoveries of truths and miracles? I have some for you if you’d like some. The things that keep people in the church are not the problems and the secular learning; it is the miracles and the faith and the answers we get from God. It’s the things the Holy Ghost whispers to you that are true and real. You are not focused on that, and therefore, in my opinion, are weaving in things that our adversary would like others to hear to draw them away from God. Focusing on members stories who left or have left the church at one point, is the opposite of faith building. Yes, I know you want to seem more balanced, and “progressive”, but the very word progressive, does not belong in the Church. The laws of God are not progressive, they are the same today and yesterday and always. I got bad feelings from the start when listening, and I think your podcasts are deceiving. I would even go as far to say that you are working for the wrong side of the truth equation my brother. I hope you pray hard over this issue, and come to a realization of your own.
      My character? I read scriptures daily, battle with consequences of my husband going inactive daily, pray daily, try to have the Spirit daily, and I can tell you that the Holy Ghost prompts me when to listen to something worthwhile and when not to. I’ve been prompted not to in this search for “Mormon” podcasts. I am not perfect, I make mistakes, I’m not better than you or anyone, but I will not listen to truth mingled with doubt. Thanks for letting me comment.

      1. I have just come across this site too, from a friend whose daughter is trying to come back to church who is on this site. I thank you for your comment, it makes sense. I know the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Lord’s true church, and also no-one is perfect so we shouldn’t expect perfect out comes all the time at church, but its our own scripture reading and following the Prophet, and striving to keep the commandments, serving others etc that brings us balance is this crazy world of confusion. I have not listened to the Pod casts and just started scrolling down the comments, thank you again for your wise words.

  12. I agree with Mark. What the world needs more of is the ability to have empathy for one another. That empathy cannot come from a negative approach to one another, regardless of what position we are blessed to hold.

    I was personally agnostic for a very long time until I was baptized on my 40th birthday. Since then, I have learned many things. The two that help the most are that I am only responsible for me – and that no one else is, and that the commandment to “judge not” is universal.

    I look forward to listening more to your podcast and to watching your website.

  13. I stumbled onto mormonstories about three weeks ago. I’ve been listening to your old podcasts and have found them very interesting. One of my faves was your interview with Rabbi Falcon. Neat guy!

  14. Hello Brother John; it’s Luigi from Australia and could yousend me some dvds as mentioned on your webiste to

    Luigi Di Bnenedetto
    Cambria Street
    Reids Flat NSW 2586
    Australia

    Thank You

    Luigi

    PS: Just read that you got booted out from the Mormon Church. You are welcome to my home in Australia for a sabbatical and anyone that could do with one.

  15. I have serious concerns about the incorrect translation that Joseph Smith made of documents presented to him by non-Mormons. These very serious errors can be considered a large problem. I understand that many “missionaries” have no knowledge of these problems. Do you have plans to openly share these problems with ALL members of your organization? Truth has nothing to fear with serious investigation and explanations that answer the honest and humbly asked questions such as: overwhelming DNA, language, and historical evidence that had stood for decades in contract to the written teaching of the LDS.

  16. John, I just want to thank you for producing these podcasts. They have been an invaluable resource to me as I have struggled through my faith crisis. In many ways they have saved my sanity as I have lost my testimony while living in a devoutly LDS community, among people who have treated me differently for breathing even a word of doubt. I could write much more than this about the intense pain I have experienced as I have gone from being a devout believer to the person I am today. However, I think it suffices to just say thank you. Like you, I still love Mormonism in many ways. I just can’t keep on believing in blind obedience, shame, and cultish behavior.

  17. Hello John,
    Just finished watching your 1st episode interviewing Shawn McCraney, May 15. While I thought you asked great questions and gave him plenty of time to talk, I thought it very interesting that I was also watching you text as Shawn was explaining his deepest beliefs. The camera shot was directly over your shoulder and I could see your phone…not your iPad, but your phone. In fact, I could see not only texting but pictures. In a world where it seems it’s so hard for us to listen, this was very disheartening for me to see. It was as a great reminder for me to improve.

    1. Post
      Author

      Jenny – I was texting my staff in the room at the time to find out what time we needed to wrap up. It’s how we communicate without disrupting the interview. And you’re right. There’s no need for that to the in the shot. But sometimes I need to communicate with my staff during these interviews, especially if there is a technical glitch or other type of problem.

  18. What happened to that episode that appeared and disappeared so quickly, about the history of Mormon Liturgy? I was so excited for that one…

  19. I just want to say how amazingly remarkable I have found your work to share so many mormon stories. Your guests are beyond courageous in opening up their harts and sharing their most personal emotions, experiences and stories. Even as a non mormon, I’m overwhelmed with my many thoughts and feelings after watching each episode. Your efforts express the true hart of humanity that transcends beyond the realm of mormonism. It touches on the love each human spirit yearns to express through each momentary life here on earth.

    Many blessings and thanks to you and your guests.

  20. Hello John,
    I met you a couple of times at your dads house and have followed you in the past and occasionally on certain topics including the Sam Young issue that is going on lately.

    I watched some of the videos about what he says the bishops were asking the youth members and I highly doubt that bishops are asking those questions. It is more likely that his daughter is just telling him what he wants to hear and or he is exaggerating most of it. I’ve been in the church all my life and I know bishops don’t ask questions like that.

    I listened to your interview with him and I kept hoping that you would give him a little push back. You were raised in the church and I’ll bet you didn’t get those questions.

    Keith

    1. Keith Bleazard –
      Just because you did or didn’t experience something in the church doesn’t mean others had the same experience you did. I was asked some of those questions. I talk to people frequently that were also asked similar questions. Sam Young’s website (protectldschildren.org) has the published stories from hundreds of people detailing the same (and worse).

      Mormons like to use the words “I know” a lot, with no evidence to back it up. Use the critical thinking skills your God gave you and think for yourself.

  21. I chose to marry a non member who I found to be one of the most honest, kind and respectful person I’d met at that time (we were both 21 when we married). His parents never brought him up in any religion, as his dad had left church in his later teens and his mom only went occasionally in hers. He was allowed to grow up and choose what he wanted to be involved in socially and was well taken of physically, but his father exposed him to porn with his magazines and his mom laughed it off.
    This became a problem that he hid during most of our marriage that he felt a lot of shame for specially when he got involved in nude clubs, alcohol, and visiting “massage parlors”-that at the point that I came across the websites he’d been visiting. I told my hubby that I was ‘done’ with our marriage because over several years he’d pushed me to walk away from the faith I’d grown up in, I was trying to bring my little ones to church alone and cried every week. My hubby had always been agnostic and very scientific and questioned things in a way that I’d never heard of. I’m glad I didn’t give up as quick as that first impulse was!!
    My father was a convert during his college years and studied geology and theology during the years of conversion and through the years I’ve heard stories of things that were said to him by upper Stake leaders in our area about how he’d never rise up to certain levels because of him being a convert-it never made sense to me. My dad held callings and was the best man I ever knew (he recently died)
    There definitely is an elitist mentality for MANY people in the church, it’s pervasive and sickens me to think that this secret ceremony exists.

    I once came across in research that a man was allowed to be sealed to dead women! Things are weird in church history and guess it goes on still. I’m not sure if these things line up with the God I personally have felt knows and loves me. Maybe I’m not in the right church.

    Recently as I’ve witnessed the unkindness by leaders and kids towards some personal moral choices our teenager made it that didn’t harm anyone but herself. The way she was treated has made me question why I’m trying to raise my kids in this environment. If my tense hearted son isn’t ready for a Mission hows that goingvtonpkay out? On our end we will love him, but his leaders will look down on him and he will feel shamed-it scares my husband and I, we consider moving out of state for this reason

    If you’d don’t follow the mainstream you wont fit in with the others and you eventually will feel it-the question is whether emotionally you will be strong enough to know you’re own worth separate from the church.

    I am grateful I married who I did and I’m grateful I had the strength to forgive him of the harm he caused during his years of being slightly unfaithful to me, even if it came out that he was I’d forgive him. He’s a fabulous father and loving husband, he’s actually honest in his daily actions verses saying he is.

    It’s very difficult for me to untangle all of these things involving the story from Tom-because relying on what I had learned about the Atonement was how I forgave my sweetheart. The nature of God and the Savior and MY OWN witness of the loving nature of Christ is what I learned in Primary and Young Women’s and Seminary those taught me about God. I feel lost if I don’t have This God to love. These teachings of the church were ultimately taught by Joseph Smith. However I’ve learned these traits are taught among other religions too.

    My view because of years of inactivity and what that involved was scary and I almost took my own life because I felt unworthy to pray since I drank occasionally, I had absolutely no friends in my neighborhood because I was “wicked” and the ward members for a time didn’t let their kids play with mine. I found it hard to see my own worth without going to church weekly.

    I began to learn to love myself recalling words from certain songs and searching for spiritual understanding in this world and to see the worth of others in various religions and why people choose no religion. These things made me into a different person than if I’d followed the normal path taught in church-it’s hard for me to teach my children to follow that course when veering taught me to really care about people and the world in general.

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