11 comments for “Mitt Romney’s Mormon Speech This Week ( Podcast )

  1. December 2, 2007 at 5:55 pm

    Yes, indeed.

  2. se7en
    December 2, 2007 at 10:57 pm

    Hopefully, it’s a good move. I understand the criticism that giving such a speech will only draw more criticism from the antagonists. Plus the bigots will always find more of whatever fuels their bigotry, especially in this speech. They’ll never be satisfied.

    Nonetheless, I feel there are many out there that could be swayed on this issue, and that is one of the reasons for this speech.

    A lot of good could come out of a speech for the Church, but that is not its purpose. It will be more political than religious, as obvious and ridiculous as that may sound.

    However, I pray that the hearts and minds of Americans will be drawn towards him. At such a critical time, I think a leader with the Gift of the Holy Ghost would be the greatest thing for our nation.

  3. Questions...
    December 3, 2007 at 9:45 am

    I think there are some very legitimate and worrisome issues here. While all religions have their share of odd ideas and beliefs, the Priesthood-based central authority of Mormonism, with its emphasis on obedience being one of the fundamental principles of the restored gospel, raises the very real potential of a genuine conflict of interest.

    From time to time the Prophets will come out with positions on various political issues that are seen as having “moral” implications. And there certainly is no fundamental reason that the Prophet couldn’t be more bold than that (the Old Testament Prophets were certainly not shy about getting involved in the “politics” of their day).

    According to the covenants he made through baptism, and in the Temple, his first responsibility is to the Church and its leaders. As a faithful member, he would be no different than anyone else in being asked to sustain, and therefore obey, the leaders of the Church, regardless of his personal, mortally limited opinions.

    If he separates himself from the counsel of the Prophets at a time like this, he would be denying his essential LDS beliefs. If he doesn’t, then the country is effectively receiving leadership from Church headquarters.

    To me, this is the fundamental question that needs to be addressed.

  4. GMAC
    December 3, 2007 at 12:51 pm

    Romney needs to do this. It is clear that he has been hesitant to give “The Speech”, but now that he has slipped in Iowa, why not? He really has nothing to lose at this point, and could benefit if he comes off well.

    Romney has said all along and will also say in this speech that he is a strong mormon and believes everything the mormons believe. However, his main stance in this speech is going to be that the higher-ups in the church will have no influence on what he does as president. He will state that he will do what’s best for the country, not necessarily for the church. I think a few church members may be somewhat alienated by his comments as he attempts to downplay the role his faith will have in his presidency.

  5. mayan elephant
    December 3, 2007 at 1:59 pm

    can he still have the holy ghost if he downplays the leaders of the church?

    can he still have the holy ghost if he employs women that have children at home?

  6. mayan elephant
    December 3, 2007 at 2:21 pm

    i hope romney, when closing his big speech, remembers to say “i say this in the name of Jesus Christ, amen.” mormons often say, “i say this in the name of THY son Jesus Christ, amen.”

    the latter is just ridiculous, unless it is a prayer. got my fingers crossed for romney that he will not make that slip.

  7. Maturin
    December 3, 2007 at 8:11 pm

    I’m not sure that I can envision a winning scenario for anyone in this move. The additional focus on his Mormonism will likely clarify and/or magnify the eccentricities of the church’s doctrines and practices bringing on only more questions…and more doubts. (Like ME, I don’t know how he can disconnect from church leadership’s influence given things like his covenant to obey the law of consecration…if he does, that will surely alienate some members of the church) The church will end up looking more weird and Romney will come off even more of a waffler than many already think he is. “Is he faithful or not?” I admire Romney’s commitment and desire to serve as president (even though I’m as yet undecided), and I think he’s done a lot of the right things in trying to separate his quest from the church. I just think that it’s impossible, no matter how hard he tries. Funny…members and missionaries have always pointed out the comprehensive role that the gospel plays in the lives of the faithful…now it seems to be a liability.

  8. Mayan Elephant
    December 4, 2007 at 1:47 pm

    Maturin,

    there is no doubt that the church is a huge liability for romney. the support from the church leaders is a liability for romney, and romney gets nothing from it. faithful mormons are typical republican anyways, and their concentration is so limited that they will have little to no influence on the election.

    could there be a win in this for romney if he were to take a stand against the church on a specific matter?

    the obvious would be for him to support something social, like gay marriage.(never gonna happen) i think there is something he could do to really boost himself here. for example, what if he used this speech to call on the church to publicly disclose its finances? its not gonna happen obviously, but, if romney were to suggest a disclosure, i think it would be a ballsy move that would show he really did mean business and he wasnt going to take any heat from the whiteshirted board of directors of a fortune100-like company, even if it was his church.

  9. California Condor
    December 4, 2007 at 4:07 pm

    Romney’s skill as an executive has been on display since he announced his candicacy on Valentine’s day. And it is nothing short of jaw-dropping. Even though Mormons represent a tiny sliver of the American population, and even though evangelical Christians label Mormons as cultists, Romney has turned himself into a frontrunner in the early primary states. It is staggering.

    Now Mike Huckabee is trading on his evangelical Christian credentials to challenge Romney’s lead in Iowa. Romney’s response appears to be this religion speech. If Romney’s campaign to date is any indication, this speech might be just what Romney needs to take the wind out of Huckabee’s sails and win Iowa.

    I think Romney would have a better chance than Huckabee of defeating Hillary or Obama in a general election. Perhaps Iowa GOP caucus-goers will come to the same conclusion in a few weeks.

  10. Ferreira
    December 4, 2007 at 11:16 pm

    I don’t think that Romney will describe mormonism in any detail, only enough to say that Mormons are faithful and are taught brotherly kindness. He will not challenge the church leaders to make a defiant stance.

    It will be a politically focused speech on religion’s roll in American politics and the general effect of faith on citizens, communities, and leaders. And another declarative statement (he’s already made countless) that he believes in Jesus and tries to live His teachings.

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